Month: February 2015

Interview with Brett Foster on his poem “On Leonardo’s ‘Figures To Represent Labor'”

A Q&A by Melissa Gordon – PY: Your poem “On Leonardo’s ‘Figures To Represent Labor’” was inspired by the drawing “Figures To Represent Labor” by Leonardo Da Vinci. This drawing is part of the Royal Trust Collection of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Did you see this drawing in person? Can you talk about your experience and how it inspired you to write your poem? BF: Alas, no, I have […]

Continue Reading →

Rediscovered Stories: Science and Soul in Sketched Figures

by Catherine D’Andrea – According to Leonardo Da Vinci, force is “a spiritual power, incorporeal and invisible, which with brief life is produced”1. Though just a partial sketch, “Figures to Represent Labor” demonstrates the artist’s understanding of force and anatomy, mass and gravity, vectors and torque. It is not complete and was abandoned mid-deed. It survives without context or connection, and little has been written about it. Yet, the sketch captures […]

Continue Reading →

Flashes of Past: The Politics of Writing a Political Novel

– Billy Lee Brammer’s The Gay Place, a collection of three related political novels, received national acclaim when it was published in 1961. Each novel follows a very Lyndon-Johnson-like Governor Arthur Fenstemaker who directs the fate of both his loved ones and the state of Texas. This was Brammer’s first and only published book. But it’s Al Reinert’s introduction to the 1978 Texas Monthly Press edition that spurs as much […]

Continue Reading →

Historical Books and Their Personal Histories

– In a box of old textbooks and odd paperbacks, this unusual book, The American Ship-Master’s Guide: Seaman’s Manual useful to merchants, ship-masters, supercargoes, mariners, and merchant’s clerks, was found in New London, Connecticut in the 1970s. Since that time, the book has been part of my family collection. I’m fortunate to live among a rich historical backdrop of the colonial and revolutionary times in New England. Old books come […]

Continue Reading →

Rediscovered Stories: Nance Van Winckel Discusses Her Inspiration and the Process of Creating Visual Poems

A Q&A by Leslie Lindenauer – PY: Your pieces published in Poor Yorick come from a series of digital photo-collage pieces taken from a current project entitled The Book of No Ledge. Can you talk about your artistic statement in this series? NVW: In my dialogue with this encyclopedia (circa 1947), I attempt to marry a bit of poetry with the know-it-all simplifier of the universe voice. Besides altering the […]

Continue Reading →