Month: November 2014

Skull Talk: A Bite of History

– It’s rare that you get a chance to bite into history, but the bialys at Kossar’s Bialys in New York City allow you to do just that. In a way each Jewish-flatbread that comes out of Kossar’s bialy oven (which has burned almost continuously for the past 60 years) is a historic artifact providing a link to a world that in many ways no longer exists. Just baked, not baked […]

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An Intersection of Art and Science: Author Rebecca Reynolds Describes her Investigation of The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary

– Not much tugs at the imagination more than objects, places, or living organisms with hybrid qualities. Author Rebecca Reynolds followed her muse to discover more about the history and mythology surrounding the plant aptly named: The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary. In the following interview she elaborates on her own fascination with this curiosity that has a hybrid appearance of both vegetable and animal. A museum educator and graduate student […]

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Project Booklust Part Two: Johnnycake Books—Salisbury, Connecticut

– Rare booksellers have stories—things that seem to define them aside from the tales in the books they sell. For the John Bale Book Company in part one of the Project Booklust series it was how Abraham Lincoln’s hair found its way into the shop. In the case of Johnnycake Books in Salisbury, Connecticut, it’s something even more personal—boxer shorts. Not just any old trunks, but handcrafted boxers embroidered with […]

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Peter Ciccariello talks about the inspiration behind his “Poor Yorick” images.

– Inspired by the line “Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him,” and the question, “Whose (skull) was it?”, I imagined that Yorick’s skeleton had a life of its own and a future. I even imagined him climbing out of his grave!  My creative process usually starts with scanned objects and photographs gleaned from walks throughout northeastern Connecticut and New England. After collaging, combining, and altering those images, a ”texture” is […]

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Interview: Assembling the World at Hand

– Poor Yorick’s Brian Lance talked with Charles Bechtel—sculptor, writer, teacher—about assembling scenes from the reclaimed pieces of everyday life.   PY: How did you discover Poor Yorick and what drove your decision to submit your work to us? CB: I discovered Poor Yorick through a Facebook friend whose post informed me of a call for submissions of artwork made from found or repurposed articles. I had just started my Assemblages, having completed […]

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Oldest Book Contest Winner: Swiss Manuscript (1636)

– Angie Cosey, our Oldest Book Contest winner, talks about her Swiss manuscript from 1636. In the summer of 2012 I found myself wandering solo through Switzerland. I’d dined on fondue in Zurich, gone paragliding in the Alps, visited the bears in Berne, hiked with the mountain goats in Creux-du-Van, picked wild raspberries from the bank of the Rhine in Vaduz, and finally arrived in Geneva at the end of my […]

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Skull Talk: A Structure of Memories

– This magnificent building overlooking the Hudson River in Peekskill, New York, was built by the prolific architect Ralph Adams Cram in 1911. For most of the twentieth century it was the home of St. Mary’s School, an Episcopal girl’s boarding and day school. Much of the school’s leadership and instruction came from the Convent of the Sisters of St. Mary, located on the same property, Mount Saint Gabriel. In […]

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Flashes of Past: Let Your Imagination Be Your Guide

– As I wait for the final Hobbit film to transport me back to Middle-Earth I’ve been thinking about the books that first sparked my love of fantasy. Certainly Tolkien’s works played their part, along with C.S. Lewis’ The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, and Norman Juster’s The Phantom Tollbooth. But the standout book in the group is too little known and appreciated: The Last of the Really Great […]

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